A Case of Primary Aortoduodenal Fistula and Abdominal Aortic
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A bacterial infection with Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii) is usually seen in farmers and animal handlers. C. burnetii, also known as Q fever, is transmitted from cattle and sheep to humans by aerosolized particles from urine, feces or amniotic fluid of contaminated animals. Q fever can present in various manners. Symptoms are mostly mild, with flu-like complaints, headaches, coughing, and nocturnal hyperhidrosis. Sixty percent of infections may be chronic and unrecognized. This article presents a case of a patient with a primary aortoduodenal fistula and AAA concomitant with chronic Q fever infection.

Case Report:
A 70-year-old man was successfully treated for an aortoduodenal fistula originating from a Q fever-related abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no known history of contact with cattle or sheep. Although the combination of abdominal aortic aneurysm and aortoduodenal fistula is rare, one should be suspicious of Q fever infection as the causative agent, and additional medical treatment should be initiated...

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