An Array of Coronavirus Vaccines: Ways in which scientists h
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An Array of Coronavirus Vaccines

Eight ways in which scientists hope to provide immunity to SARS-CoV-2


More than 90 vaccines are being developed against SARS-CoV-2 by research teams in companies and universities across the world. Researchers are trialing different technologies, some of which haven’t been used in a licensed vaccine before. At least six groups have already begun injecting formulations into volunteers in safety trials; others have started testing in animals, suggests the article published in Nature journal.

SARS-CoV-2 vaccines: A variety of approaches
All vaccines aim to expose the body to an antigen that won’t cause disease, but will provoke an immune response that can block or kill the virus if a person becomes infected. There are at least eight types being tried against the coronavirus, and they rely on different viruses or viral parts. 

 

Here are the graphical representations to explains each vaccine design:

1. VIRUS VACCINES
At least seven teams are developing vaccines using the virus itself, in a weakened or inactivated form. Many existing vaccines are made in this way, such as those against measles and polio, but they require extensive safety testing. Sinovac Biotech in Beijing has started to test an inactivated version of SARS-CoV-2 in humans.

 

 

2. VIRAL-VECTOR VACCINES
Around 25 groups say they are working on viral-vector vaccines. A virus such as measles or adenovirus is genetically engineered so that it can produce coronavirus proteins in the body. These viruses are weakened so they cannot cause disease. There are two types: those that can still replicate within cells and those that cannot because key genes have been disabled.

 

 

3. NUCLEIC-ACID VACCINES
At least 20 teams are aiming to use genetic instructions (in the form of DNA or RNA) for a coronavirus protein that prompts an immune response. The nucleic acid is inserted into human cells, which then churn out copies of the virus protein; most of these vaccines encode the virus’s spike protein.

 

 

4. PROTEIN-BASED VACCINES
Many researchers want to inject coronavirus proteins directly into the body. Fragments of proteins or protein shells that mimic the coronavirus’s outer coat can also be used.

 

Source: Nature


 

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Neha Rathour
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Dr. s●●●●●i S●●●●●●●●●●●●m and 46 others like this32 shares
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S●●●●●a T●●●●●i General Medicine
Very informative
Jun 2, 2020Like
S●●●●●a T●●●●●i
S●●●●●a T●●●●●i General Medicine
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Jun 2, 2020Like
Dr. s●●●●●i S●●●●●●●●●●●●m
Dr. s●●●●●i S●●●●●●●●●●●●m General Medicine
Wow, so many teams and these many points of attacking the virus.Interesting👍👍🙌
Jun 15, 2020Like