An update on periocular dermatoses
The periocular area may be affected by infectious or noninfectious diseases such as inflammatory dermatoses, systemic disease, drug reactions, benign and malignant lesions, traumatic lesions, and esthetic complications. Published in the International Journal of Women's Dermatology, the authors present a review of the most common periocular dermatoses.

The functional purpose of the periocular area stands out among all other purposes. The main structure must be preserved to maintain the sight function and the eyelids are responsible to physically protect the eyeball, acting as a barrier to foreign objects and trauma. The lubrication of the cornea by the lacrimal film is another essential role, which is fulfilled by making the palpebral anatomy suitable through thin and flexible skin that covers the deeper structures.

The eyelashes originate in the free palpebral border and their main function is the protection of the eye by closing with reflex stimulation. The upper eyelashes curve upward and the lower ones downward so they do not interfere with each other. Individuals of all races have them with variations in length and thickness, but they are always present; thus, their absence is pathologic.

The periocular area is also a very relevant aesthetic unit of the face and is one of the first to show signs of aging. For this reason, this area is frequently treated with cosmetic intentions.

The periocular area may be affected by infectious or noninfectious diseases such as inflammatory dermatoses, systemic disease, drug reactions, benign and malignant lesions, traumatic lesions, and esthetic complications.

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