Anaesthesia Drugs: Muscle relaxants increase the risk of res
Muscle relaxants are a necessary part of anesthesia during certain major operations. Studies have, however, hinted at respiratory risks connected with these drugs.

POPULAR, a major prospective observational European study supported by the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) and led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has confirmed the association between use of muscle relaxants and respiratory complications and assessed the chances of the current avoidance strategies.

Anesthetics make patients unconscious during an operation and prevent them from feeling pain. Muscles, however, are not paralyzed by these drugs and may still move.

The first results from this study are now being published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. They confirm what earlier studies based on pre-existing data had hinted at: The use of neuromuscular blockers during general anesthesia is associated with a significantly increased risk of several respiratory complications after surgery.

The most common complications involving the respiratory system were a reduced capacity of the lung transiently to absorb oxygen (5.2%), and infections of the lung and respiratory tract (2.5%). Roughly three-quarters of all patients (17150 people) were treated with neuromuscular blocking agents. They were shown to have a significantly higher risk (+4.4%) of developing any type of respiratory complication.

Read more about the research here: https://pxmd.co/47FCN

The original research paper can be read here: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanres/article/PIIS2213-2600(18)30294-7/fulltext
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