Anomalous Right Coronary Artery: A Multimodality Hunt for th
Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...
Get authentic, real-time news that helps you fight COVID-19 better.
Install PlexusMD App for doctors. It's free.
Introduction
Congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries occur in approximately 1% of the general population [1]. Anomalies can involve the origin, course, and/or termination of the vessel(s). Anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ARCAPA) is very rare and has an incidence of only 0.002%??[2]. ARCAPA has a broad range of clinical manifestations ranging from sudden death, chest pain, and shortness of breath to incidental discovery in asymptomatic individuals.

Case Report
A previously healthy 48-year-old female presented to the emergency department with sudden onset right scapular and right thoracic chest pain, as well as shortness of breath with exertion. She had no previous cardiovascular history and her only cardiac risk factor was a four pack-year history of smoking.

On physical examination, her vital signs and cardiovascular examination were normal. There was no evidence of congestive cardiac failure or murmurs. She had tenderness to palpation inferior to her right scapula. Shoulder examination was otherwise normal. Serial cardiac enzymes were negative; however, her resting ECG showed T-wave inversions in leads V1–V3. Her chest X-ray did not show cardiomegaly or signs of pulmonary edema.....


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4008445/
Like
Comment
Share