Association between Habitual Snoring and Cognitive Performan
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The study’s findings suggest that incorporating appropriate adjustments for demographic, anthropometric, and socioeconomic characteristics is warranted when using epidemiologic surveys and clinical guidelines to assess or synthesize data associated with neurobehavioral outcomes among children with habitual snoring.

This JAMA study was aimed to assess the extent to which potential confounding factors modify the association between parent-reported habitual snoring and cognitive outcomes among a large and diverse sample of typically developing preadolescent children.

This cross-sectional analysis used a baseline data set from children enrolled in the ongoing Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study. Children aged 9 to 10 years without serious psychiatric or neurological comorbidities were recruited at 21 research sites in the US. Study recruitment was designed to approximate the racial and socioeconomic diversity of the US population. Data were analyzed.

A total of 11873 children aged 9 to 10 years were included in the study. Of those, habitual snoring was reported in 810 children, and nonhabitual snoring was reported in 4058 children.

--In the unadjusted models, the total cognitive function composite score among children who habitually snored was significantly lower compared with children who never snored.

--Differences were also identified in the crystallized cognition and fluid cognition composite scores.

--The association between habitual snoring and cognitive performance was substantially attenuated after adjustment for covariates. Similar mitigation was also observed for all domain-specific scores.

In particular, when adjusted for baseline demographic, anthropometric, and socioeconomic characteristics, the association between parent-reported habitual snoring and cognitive performance was substantially attenuated among children aged 9 to 10 years.

Source: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/article-abstract/2776922
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