Association of Balance Function with All-Cause and Cause-Spe
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Difficulty maintaining balance is common among individuals aged 40 years or older and increases the risk of falls. Balance disorder appears to be associated with a higher risk of death from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer in the long term.

This JAMA study was purposed to investigate the association of balance function with all-cause and cause-specific mortality among US adults.

A prospective, population-based cohort study of a nationally representative sample of 5816 adults from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was conducted. Individuals aged 40 years or older who completed the modified Romberg Test of Standing Balance on Firm and Compliant Support Surfaces were included. Participants were linked to mortality data from the test date through December 31, 2015.

A total of 5816 adults were included in this cohort study. During up to 16.8 years of follow-up, 1530 deaths occurred, including 342 associated with CVD and 364 associated with cancer.

Participants with balance disorder were at a higher risk of death from all causes, CVD, and cancer. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, and chronic conditions, the hazard ratios (HRs) among participants with balance disorder compared with those without balance disorder were 1.44 for all-cause mortality, 1.65 for CVD mortality, and 1.37 for cancer mortality. Furthermore, vestibular balance disorder was associated with increased mortality from all causes, CVD, and cancer.

Conclusively, in this nationally representative sample of US adults, balance disorder was associated with an increased risk of all-cause, CVD, and cancer mortality.

Source: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/article-abstract/2777174
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