Autonomous cortisol secretion influences psychopathological
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Primary aldosteronism (PA) is associated with impaired quality of life (QoL). Autonomous cortisol co-secretion (ACS) is a relevant phenotype of PA, which could contribute to depression and anxiety disorders. This has not been investigated so far.

This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of depression and anxiety in PA patients according to ACS.

Researchers performed testing for hypercortisolism and evaluated anxiety, depression and QoL by self-rating questionnaires in newly diagnosed PA patients of the German Conn's Registry; 298 patients were reevaluated at follow-up.

Results:
-- In the overall cohort, scores for anxiety, depression, and QoL (mental p=0.021; physical p=0.015) improved significantly at follow-up.

-- This improvement was seen in both subgroups of patients with and without ACS, with the exception of the mental subscore in no-ACS patients.

-- Analysis for sex differences showed that anxiety decreased significantly in females with ACS and no-ACS, whereas males with no-ACS failed to improve.

-- Depression improved significantly in males and females with ACS, but not in those with no-ACS.

-- Physical subscore of QoL improved significantly in females with ACS and mental subscore in males with ACS, whereas no differences were seen for the no-ACS groups.

Conclusively, improvement in depression and anxiety scores in response to treatment of PA is more pronounced in patients with ACS in contrast to no-ACS suggesting a role of ACS in the psychopathological symptoms of patients with PA. Furthermore, we observed significant differences in depression and anxiety scores between the sexes.

Source: https://academic.oup.com/jcem/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1210/clinem/dgab099/6141462?redirectedFrom=fulltext
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