Being Firstborn Linked to Lower Heart Disease Risk
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Birth order and the number of siblings may be tied to a person's risk for heart disease and mortality, according to a study. Being the oldest child may have benefits: For first-born men and women with one or two younger siblings, the risk of death and for nonfatal cardiovascular events is slightly lower than it is for those without siblings.

From the Multiple-Generation Register in Sweden, data were used from 1.36 million men and 1.32 million women, aged 30–58 years at baseline and with follow-up. The mean age at follow-up was 67 years. Fatal and non-fatal events were retrieved from national registers.

-- Compared with men with no siblings, those with 1–2 siblings had a lower, and those with four or more siblings had a higher adjusted risk of cardiovascular events.

--Again, compared with men with no siblings, those with more than one sibling had a lower total mortality risk, and those with three or more siblings had an increased risk of coronary events.

--Correspondingly, compared with women with no siblings those women with three siblings or more had an increased risk of cardiovascular events, and those with two siblings or more had an increased risk of coronary events.

--Women with one sibling or more were at lower total mortality risk, following full adjustment.

Conclusively, being firstborn is associated with a favorable effect on non-fatal cardiovascular and coronary events for both men and women.

BMJ
Source: https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/11/6/e042881
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