Blood test to detect concussion and subconcussive injuries i
In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers at Orlando Health are making new progress in finding ways to detect a traumatic yet sinister brain injury -- and getting closer to preventing further damage.

Subconcussive injuries often show no symptoms or immediate effects, but can cause wear and tear on the brain over time with repeated injuries. The latest study, published in the journal BMJ Paediatrics Open, includes more than 700 emergency room patients -- children and adults. The study gets us closer to developing a standard blood test to spot these injuries as early as possible.

"A unique feature of this study is that it includes patients who hit their heads but have no symptoms," said Linda Papa, MD, lead author of the study and emergency medicine doctor at Orlando Health. "This group is rarely -- if ever -- included in biomarker studies."

The blood test looks for two proteins (GFAP and UCH-L1) found in our brains and released into blood after an injury -- higher levels of which could indicate a concussion or subconcussive injury. Dr. Papa has been studying these biomarkers for more than a decade. Some of her previous studies have focused on athletes, but now she's expanding her research on subconcussive injuries to the general population and all age groups.

Historically, people who suffer head trauma without concussion symptoms may have been classified as having "no injury." Plus, there are very few studies addressing the impact of subconcussive injuries following head trauma in the civilian population, as opposed to military members or athletes.

Source: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-08/m-sbt082119.php
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