Caring for Older Adults with Self-Reported Vision Impairment
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A Study was conducted to examine caregiving relationships for older adults with vision impairment (VI).

The study included 1,776 family/unpaid caregivers of community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries over the age of 65. Reports of blindness or trouble with distance or close vision is classified as vision impairment.

Main Outcome Measure(s) were: In the preceding month, the number of:
(1) hours of care provided,
(2) valued activities affected by caregiving, and
(3) odds of experiencing substantial emotional,
(4) financial, and
(5) physical difficulty related to providing care

Results:
--Among 1,776 caregivers, 428 spent an average of 111 hours per month assisting older adults with VI, while 1,348 spent an average of 72 hours assisting older adults without VI.

--In fully adjusted negative binomial regression analysis, caregivers of older adults with vision impairment spent 36% more hours (Incident Rate Ratio [IRR]=1.36) providing care and reported having 61% more valued activities affected (IRR=1.61) than caregivers of older adults without vision impairment.

--In fully adjusted logistic regression analysis, caregivers of older adults with vision impairment had greater odds of emotional (Odds Ratio [OR]=1.46) but not financial (OR=1.33) or physical (OR=1.13) difficulty related to providing care than caregivers of older adults without vision impairment.

These findings show that caring for older adults with vision impairment places different demands on time and emotional well-being than caring for older adults without vision impairment, but that there are no gaps in financial or physical hardships.

Source: https://www.ajo.com/article/S0002-9394(21)00155-0/fulltext?rss=yes
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