Cerebral Oxygenation and Perfusion in Preterm Infants while
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A Study was conducted to evaluate the cerebral oxygenation (cTOI) and cerebral perfusion in preterm infants in supine versus prone positions that inferred prone posture increased cerebral oxygenation and decreased cerebral hypoxemia.

The researchers enrolled 60 premature babies born before 32 weeks of pregnancy, 30 of whom had bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, identified as the need for respiratory support and/or supplementary oxygen at 36 weeks postmenstrual age). In both the supine and prone positions, cerebral perfusion, cTOI, and polysomnography were measured, with the initial position being randomized. Infants who had a major intraventricular hemorrhage or a major congenital anomaly were removed from the study.

Results:
--Cerebral perfusion was unaffected by position or BPD status.

--In the BPD group, the mean cTOI was higher in the prone position as compared with the supine position by a difference of 3.27% with no difference seen in the no–BPD group.

--For the BPD group, the burden of cerebral hypoxemia (cumulative time spent with cTOI less than 55%) was significantly lower in the prone position (23%) compared with the supine position (29%). In those without BPD, position had no effect on cTOI.

Finally, the prone posture increased cerebral oxygenation and decreased cerebral hypoxemia in preterm infants with BPD. These results may have an effect on positioning strategies.

Source: https://www.jpeds.com/article/S0022-3476(21)00329-2/fulltext?rss=yes
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