Chronological changes of serum exosome in preterm infants: S
Exosomes are nanosized extracellular vesicles having an intercellular communication mechanism that can be found in all human fluids, including serum. Exosomes potential clinical applications in newborn disorders were recently highlighted.

Researchers evaluated the chronological changes in the concentration of serum-derived exosomes in preterm infants after birth. In this prospective study, we measured the concentration of serum-derived exosomes of 20 infants for 12 months after birth.

Results:
--The average concentration of serum-derived exosomes was 4.6×1010 particles/ml at birth and increased significantly until 48 weeks old.

--There was a moderate correlation between the gestational age and the concentration of serum-derived exosomes both at birth (r=0.54), and during 8 weeks after birth (r=0.48).

--A multivariable analysis showed that the gestational age at birth was associated with the concentration of serum-derived exosomes at birth (partial regression coefficient, 0.86).

Preterm infants serum-derived exosome concentrations rose both chronologically and gestationally age-dependently after birth. These fundamental facts may aid in a better understanding of the physiology of exosomes in preterm newborns.

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ped.14933?af=R
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