Clinical Features and Prognosis of Severe Scorpion Envenomat
Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...
Scorpionism is endemic and represents a real public health problem in Morocco. Its envenomation can be lethal, especially for children. This study aimed to determine a clinico-epidemiological profile of severe scorpion envenomation (SSE) among children and identify risk factors for mortality.

This retrospective cohort study included 606 children admitted for SSE from January 2010 to July 2015 in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of Mohammed VI Teaching Hospital.

Results:
--The mean age of envenomed children was 6.3 ± 4.2 years.
--74% of them came from rural settings.
--Envenomation occurred mostly during the summer months and 78.4% of stings were nocturnal.
--The time between the sting and evaluation was greater than 2 hours in 83% of cases.
--Bivariate analysis indicated that from 1-24 months of age, hyperthermia, episodes of diarrhea, tachycardia, abdominal distention, skin marbling, signs of respiratory distress, irritability, generalized seizures, and GlasgowComa Score (GCS) of 3 to 9 were significantly correlated with mortality.
--On multivariate analysis, diarrhea, skin marbling, respiratory distress, and GCS 3-9 were found to be independent risk factors for mortality in patient population.

To summarize, children are at a high risk of severe complications, including death, as a result of SSE. Multiple causes, including previously reported central nervous system changes, tend to increase the mortality risk in children after scorpion envenomation, according to researchers.

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ped.14687?af=R
Like
Comment
Share