Compression fracture Effect on trabecular bone score at lumb
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Vertebral compression fractures (VCF) can cause an increase in bone mineral density (BMD). Trabecular bone scores (TBS) were found to be less affected by broken vertebrae than BMD in this study. Most compression fractures, including old and recent VCF with mild or moderate deformity and old VCF with extreme deformity, have a TBS that can still be used to predict fracture risk.

Trabecular bone score (TBS), a noninvasive tool estimating bone microarchitecture, provides complementary information to lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD). Lumbar spine BMD might be increased due to both degenerative disease and vertebral compression fractures (VCF). Lumbar spine TBS has been confirmed not influenced by osteoarthrosis, but the effects of VCF are still not been well evaluated. This study aimed to investigate whether lumbar spine TBS was affected by fractured vertebrae.

Researchers studied postmenopausal women and men above 50 years old who underwent DXA. By calculating the difference of BMD and TBS between L1 and the mean of L2-3, the study compared the difference of values between the control group and fracture group to determine the effects of fractured vertebrae on BMD and TBS.

Results:
--A total of 377 participants were enrolled with 202 in the control group (157 females) and 175 in the fracture group (147 females).

--The mean BMD of the L1 vertebrae in the fracture group was significantly higher than that in the control group.

--There was no significant difference between the mean differences of TBS between L1 and the means of L2-3 vertebrae in the control group and the most compression fractures, including old and recent VCF with mild or moderate deformity and old VCF with severe deformity.

Finally, unlike BMD, lumbar spine TBS is less affected by broken vertebrae. Most compression fractures, including old and recent VCF with mild or moderate deformity and old VCF with extreme deformity, have a TBS that can still be used to predict fracture risk.

Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00198-020-05707-3
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