Dentists can be the first line of defense against domestic v
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix and Midwestern University have published an article to bring to light the important role dentists can play in identifying domestic violence victims.

Published in the Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma, the article reports that as much as 75 percent of head and neck trauma associated with domestic violence occurs with oral injury. Researchers concluded that dentists are in the unique position to be the first line of defense in identifying evidence of assault, and then reporting potential cases of domestic violence.

"The overall purpose of the paper is to bring dentistry and its subspecialties into the conversation about traumatic brain injury (TBI), specifically in cases of domestic violence," said Midwestern University dental student Timothy Ellis, lead author of the study.

"In our society, and others around the world, domestic violence is more common than many would suspect. Survivors recount 'too many times to remember' that they were abused and blacked out or were struck in the head. Thus, oral and facial trauma may be treated or identified by dentists and dental sub-specialists, opening another avenue for patients to gain access to proper care or needed assistance."

The oral biomarkers that could help dentists potentially identify domestic violence victims include tears, fractures, breaks and chips in the teeth and mouth that would be inconsistent with personal history and, therefore, raise the index of suspicion. Obvious signs of violence that may indicate brain injury include jaw or tooth fractures, trauma to nerves in the mouth and jaw, as well as damage to the nasal bone. Tooth discoloration, blunted roots and pulpal necrosis, which is the death of cells and tissues in the center of a tooth, also may be signs of a previous dental trauma warranting further investigation.

According to the publication, dentists receive little to no education about identifying and discussing domestic violence with potential victims, yet they may be the first and only health professional to evaluate a domestic violence victim.

Read more: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190425133034.htm
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Dr. D●●●●●i V●●●●●h
Dr. D●●●●●i V●●●●●h Dentistry
Assault with domestic filling would be additional burden, yet workload neither strenous nor unagreeable.
May 2, 2019Like