Diabetes, CVD Tied to Worse Prognosis for COVID-19 Infection
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Indications so far are that people with diabetes and other chronic medical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), will have a worse prognosis if they become infected with COVID-19, the novel coronavirus that has emerged in China.

There is also evidence that diabetes may increase risk for infection caused by COVID-19 two- to threefold, independently of other medical problems, such as CVD.

Although more detailed analysis is needed to show a clearly defined connection between conditions such as diabetes and worse prognosis with COVID-19, the statistics suggest that this virus hits hardest among the most vulnerable, ie, the elderly and people with multiple medical problems, especially those with diabetes of long duration that has not been well controlled.

In past infectious disease outbreaks, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and H1N1 flu, people with diabetes were at increased risk for severe illness and death. In serious cases of infection, the COVID-19 virus invades the cells that line the respiratory tract and lungs and enters the mucus, causing pneumonia. Severe lung damage by pneumonia can result in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which in turn can cause septic shock.

ARDS and septic shock are the main reasons of death caused by COVID-19. So far, Hong Kong has had only 70 confirmed cases of COVID-19, although the first Hong Kong resident to die following the viral attack was a 39-year-old man with diabetes. That death was soon followed by a second death ― a 70-year-old man with diabetes and other medical problems, including high blood pressure and kidney disease.

Case Fatality Rate for Diabetes Is High, but Interpretation Tricky:

So far, for all age groups, the highest CFR is among people aged 80 years or older, at 14.8%. CFRs have been higher in people with other medical conditions than in healthy people. CVD and diabetes top that list, at case fatality rates of 10.5% and 7.3%, respectively, compared to 0.9% for people without any prior disease, according to the aforementioned latest CCDC report.

Source: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/925681#vp_3
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