Different forms of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation i
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Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major cause of death in the Western world with an estimated number of 275 000 treated with resuscitation attempts by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in Europe each year. Overall survival rates remain low, and most studies indicate that around 1 out 10 will survive to 30 days.

Amongst the strongest factors associated with survival in OHCA is first recorded rhythm amendable to defibrillation, early defibrillation and prompt initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Overall, CPR started prior to EMS arrival has repeatedly been shown to be associated with survival rates 2–3 times higher compared with no such initiation. The primary goal of CPR is to generate sufficient blood flow to vital organs, mainly the brain and heart, until restoration of spontaneous circulation can be achieved.

Barriers to the initiation of CPR by bystanders in OHCA include fear of being incapable, causing harm, and transmission of infectious diseases. Partly due to these barriers, and low rates of CPR, the concept of CPR with compression only was proposed as a simpler form of resuscitation with the aim to be more widely accepted by the public in the 1990s. But how reliable is the evidence supporting this simpler form of CPR, and are the outcomes after CO?CPR comparable to standard CPR?

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/joim.13260
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