Doctors in china get attacked so often, they now need armed
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Dr. Binal Doshi
Doctors in china get attacked so often, they now need armed police guards
Like most people, Chen Zhongwei knew his killer, though not terribly well. The 60-year-old retired dentist had treated him 25 years previously in China's southern city of Guangzhou. The patient, who had a history of mental illness, became enraged when, all those years later, his teeth began to discolor. Chen was found in his home riddled with stab wounds.

Chen's death is an extreme example of a common problem in China: violence against medical professionals. That same day, May 11, three people were arrested in China's southwestern city of Chongqing after they attacked a doctor with a knife. On May 15, a doctor in Hunan province died after he was struck on the head by the relative of a patient queuing for treatment. On May 23, five doctors were attacked at Dafeng Hospital, also in Guangzhou, where Chen died, by furious relatives of a female patient who had died following a procedure.

The authorities promised action. The central government ordered armed police to guard hospitals to prevent attacks on doctors, with instructions to 'use weapons against potential attackers if necessary';

'Having more police in hospitals to protect doctors is a sad thing,'says Li Huijuan, a lawyer specializing in medical disputes for the Zhonglun W'D Law Firm. 'But it has to be done because there is no alternative at the moment.' Public hospitals can lack facilities for modern procedures and there remain prohibitive entry barriers for private care. Doctors remain underpaid compared with the other professions, and, coupled with long hours and the threat of violence, medical schools struggle to attract high quality candidates. There is a fundamental lack of trust between the public and those in positions of authority, who are often perceived as venal and self-serving. That perception extends to medical professionals.

http://time.com/4402311/china-attacks-doctors-medical-police-medicine-healthcare/
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S●●●●i G●●●a General Medicine
Omg
Mar 26, 2017Like
Dr. A●●f R●●●●d
Dr. A●●f R●●●●d Internal Medicine
Its a common problem faced by every doctor which needs immediate consideration by every state gov
Apr 6, 2017Like