Early Childhood Screening Tool for Psychopathology Risk in P
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A Study was conducted to evaluate the Preschool Feeling Checklist (PFC) utility for predicting later mental disorders and functioning for children and assess whether the PFC’s predictive utility differs as a function of childhood poverty.

Data from a prospective longitudinal study of preschoolers in St. Louis was examined by the researchers. Preschoolers were recruited from primary care clinics and tested every year for the next 10-15 years. The PFC looked for signs of depression. Later, to arrive at a DSM diagnosis, age-appropriate psychiatric screening interviews were used. To see if the relationship between the PFC and later outcomes was moderated by income-to-needs, researchers used regression and moderation analysis, as well as multilevel modeling.

Results:
--The PFC predicted MDD (OR: 1.13), ADHD (OR: 1.16) and Mania (OR: 1.18) in adolescence and early adulthood.
--Income-to-needs was a moderator in the predictive pathway between the PFC and later MDD (OR: 1.10) and Mania (OR: 1.19) with the measure less predictive for children living in poverty.
--The PFC predicted worse functioning by the final assessment (b = 1.71, SE = 0.51).

Finally, the PFC was found to be a predictor of later ADHD and disability in all children. Only children who live above the poverty line may use it to predict future mood disorders. Predicting depression in children who live in poverty may necessitate taking into account risk factors not covered by the PFC.

Source: https://www.jpeds.com/article/S0022-3476(21)00393-0/fulltext?rss=yes
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