Elevated clotting factor V levels linked to worse outcomes i
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Patients hospitalized with severe COVID-19 infections who have high levels of the blood clotting protein factor V are at elevated risk for serious injury from blood clots such as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have found.

In March 2020, in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic in Massachusetts, researchers found that a blood sample from a patient with severe COVID-19 on a ventilator contained factor V levels high above the normal reference range. Four days later, this patient developed a saddle pulmonary embolism, a potentially fatal blood clot occurring at the junction of the left and right pulmonary arteries.

This pointed the investigators to activity of factor V as well as factor VIII and factor X, two other major clotting factors. They studied the levels of these clotting factors and other parameters in a group of 102 consecutive patients with COVID-19, and compared the results with those of current critically ill patients without COVID-19, and with historical controls.

They found that factor V levels were significantly elevated among patients with COVID-19 compared with controls, and that the association between high factor V activity and COVID-19 was the strongest among all clinical parameters studied.

In all, 33 percent of patients with factor V activity well above the reference range had either deep vein thrombosis or a pulmonary embolism, compared with only 13 percent of patients with lower levels. Death rates were significantly higher for patients with lower levels of factor V (30 percent vs. 12 percent), with evidence that this was due to a clinical decline toward a DIC-like state.

Researchers also found that the clinical decline toward DIC was foreshadowed by a measurable change in the shape or "waveform" of a plot charting light absorbance against the time it takes blood to coagulate (waveform of the activated partial thromboplastin time, or aPTT).

"The waveform can actually be a useful tool to help assess patients as to whether their clinical course is declining toward DIC or not," researchers explain. "The lab tests that usually diagnose DIC were not helpful in these cases."

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ajh.25979
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