Evaluation of Posttraumatic Headache phenotype and recovery
Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...
The findings suggest that posttraumatic headache (PTH) with migraine phenotype may be a marker for more significant injury or deleterious pathophysiology after head injury and could be a target for early intervention to prevent persistent and disabling symptoms following concussion.

This JAMA Neurology study was aimed to describe the characteristics of youth with PTH and determine whether the PTH phenotype is associated with outcome.

This cohort study examined outcomes from patients in a multi-institutional registry of traumatic brain injury (TBI) clinics. Inclusion criteria included being between ages 5 and 18 years at enrollment and presentation within 8 weeks of a mild TBI.

A total of 612 patients were enrolled, of whom 387 patients with 395 concussions consented to participate in this study. 109 concussions were excluded, leaving 281 participants with 286 concussions. At the initial visit, 133 concussions were from patients experiencing PTH with a migraine phenotype, 57 were from patients experiencing PTH with a nonmigraine phenotype, and 96 were from patients with no PTH.

--Patients with any PTH after concussion were more likely to have prolonged recovery than those without PTH.

--Patients with PTH and a migraine phenotype took significantly longer to recover than those with the nonmigraine phenotype.

--Within each phenotype, there was no significant difference between sexes in recovery or PTH at 3 months.

In particular, PTH with a migraine phenotype is associated with persistent symptoms following concussion compared with nonmigraine PTH or no PTH.

Source: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2777144
Like
Comment
Share