First baby born via uterus transplant from a deceased donor
In a first, a baby has been born following a uterus transplantation from a deceased donor, according to a case study from Brazil published recently in The Lancet.

The recipient of the transplant was a patient with uterine infertility. The surgery took place in September 2016. The recipient of the uterus was a 32 year-old woman born without a uterus as a result of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome. She had IVF cycle four months before a transplant, resulting in eight fertilised eggs which were cryopreserved.

The donor was 45 years old and died of subarachnoid haemorrhage. The uterus was removed from the donor and then transplanted into the recipient in surgery lasting 10.5 hours. The surgery involved connecting the donor uterus' and recipient's veins and arteries, ligaments, and vaginal canals.
Immunosuppression was continued outside of hospital until the birth.

Five months after transplantation, the uterus had no signs of rejection, ultrasound scans showed no anomalies, and the recipient was having regular menstruation. The fertilised eggs were implanted after seven months.

Ten days after implantation, the recipient was confirmed to be pregnant. Non-invasive prenatal testing was done at 10 weeks, showing a normal fetus, and ultrasound scans at 12 and 20 weeks revealed no fetal anomalies.

The baby girl was born via caesarean section at 35 weeks and three days, and weighed 2550g (around 6lbs). The transplanted uterus was removed during the caesarean section and showed no anomalies.

Both the recipient and baby were discharged three days after birth, with an uneventful early follow-up. The immunosuppressive therapy was suspended at the end of the hysterectomy. At the age of seven months and 20 days the baby continued to breastfeed and weighed 7.2kg.

The first childbirth following uterine transplantation from living donors occurred in Sweden in September 2013 and in total, there have been 39 procedures of this kind, resulting in 11 live births so far.

The authors noted that transplants from deceased donors might have some benefits over donations from live donors, including removing surgical risks for a live donor, and that many countries already have well-established national systems to regulate and distribute organ donations from deceased donors. In addition, through implanting the fertilised eggs sooner they reduced the amount of time taking immunosuppression drugs, which could help to reduce side effects and costs.

Know more here: https://pxmd.co/z4Jl3

The case study will go live here at the time the embargo lifts: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(18)31766-5/fulltext
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