Flu, Pneumonia Vaccines Tied to Lower Alzheimer's Risk
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Flu and pneumonia vaccinations were linked to reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, research from the virtual Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) suggested.

People who were vaccinated against pneumonia when they were ages 65 to 75 years had nearly 40% less risk of Alzheimer's disease depending on their genetic profile, and having at least one influenza vaccination was associated with a 17% reduction in Alzheimer's prevalence, report researchers.

In their report, researchers looked at links between Alzheimer's and pneumococcal vaccination, with and without an accompanying seasonal flu shot, in 5,146 participants, ages 65 and older. They took into account a strong genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease -- G allele of rs2075650 [in the TOMM40 gene] -- linked to NECTIN2 gene, which is involved in blood-brain barrier permeability and vulnerability to infection.

Being vaccinated against pneumonia between ages 65 and 75 was tied to reduced risk of Alzheimer's afterwards.

Total count of pneumonia and flu vaccinations between ages 65 and 75 also correlated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's later in life but this effect was not seen for flu shots alone.

Links between flu vaccination and Alzheimer's were strongest for people who had their first vaccine at a younger age: those who received their first documented flu shot at age 60 benefitted more than those who received their first shot at age 70.

Source: https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/aaic/87752
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