He went from a playful little boy to ‘a zombie.’ Why wouldn
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Dr. Milap Patel
He went from a playful little boy to ‘a zombie.’ Why wouldn’t the doctors listen?
As she grabbed her car keys and sprinted out of her office, Kimberly Almarode struggled to control the terror that surged through her body. Her son’s preschool teacher had just called to say that her 4-year-old son, Bentley, had fallen asleep in a classroom playhouse and teachers were having trouble rousing him. During the previous two weeks, Almarode had grown increasingly worried about her previously healthy middle child. Bentley complained of frequent headaches that had worsened from bothersome to debilitating. But Almarode’s insistence that something serious was wrong with Bentley was dismissed by doctors who attributed his headaches, lethargy and episodic vomiting to a virus. The doctors were surprised to discover a disorder unusual in children.

Option 1: A Chiari malformation

Option 2: Pseudotumor cerebri

Option 3: Pediatric brain cancer

Option 4: An injury from a fall

Can you find out the cause?
Dr. N●●●a N●●k and 4 others like this
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N●●●●a K●●●r S●●●●m
N●●●●a K●●●r S●●●●m General Surgery
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Mar 14, 2017Like
Dr. M●●●p P●●●l
Dr. M●●●p P●●●l Neurology
Pseudotumor cerebri. One of the first tests U-Va, showed a Chiari malformation in which tissue from the cerebellum protrudes into the spinal canal.But a Chiari shouldn’t cause high intracranial pressure, a life-threatening condition.A normal reading for a 4-year-old is about 10 mmHG, Bentley’s pressure at times rose into the 50s. The doctors suspected that the malformation was not the cause of Bentley’s problem but the result of it. His headaches, vomiting and stupor were caused by pseudotumor cerebri.Pseudotumor is most common in young obese women, but it sometimes occurs in children. If no underlying cause is found, as in Bentley’s case, the disorder is called idiopathic intracranial hypertension; it affects about 1 person in 100,000.... Read more
Mar 15, 2017Like