Higher incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome after bilateral o
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Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), which causes tingling and numbness in the hand, more commonly affects women than men and tends to peak around the age of menopause. A new study suggests the risk of severe CTS increases in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before menopause, and estrogen therapy didn't provide a protective effect.

In this study, 1,653 premenopausal women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy were compared with a sample of 1,653 age-matched women who did not undergo the same surgery. Both groups were assessed for CTS in subsequent years using diagnostic codes.

--This study is one of the first to demonstrate an increased long-term risk of de novo severe CTS in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before menopause.

--The risk was greater in women with lower body mass index, women who had never given birth to a child or carried a pregnancy, and in those with a benign ovarian indication for oophorectomy.

--The study did not find a protective effect of estrogen therapy after the surgery.

"This study highlights yet another risk associated with bilateral oophorectomy before natural menopause. Together, the findings of this study and others showing increased risk for disease outcomes, such as heart disease and dementia, should prompt a reassessment of bilateral oophorectomy before menopause in women who are not at high risk for ovarian cancer."

Menopause
Source: https://www.menopause.org/docs/default-source/press-release/risk-of-severe-carpal-tunnel-syndrome-5-19-21.pdf
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