Hip replacement surgery improves symptoms and biomechanics—b
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Patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) show a significant reduction in pain and other symptoms and improvement in walking gait biomechanics. However, those improvements do not lead to increased daily physical activity levels, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

The aim of this study was to determine the change in 24-hour activity profile (waking activities and sleep) and laboratory-based gait function from preoperatively to 2 years following the THA.

Fifty-one patients undergoing primary THA at a single public hospital were recruited. All THAs were performed using a posterior surgical approach with the same prosthesis type. A wrist-worn accelerometer was used to capture 24-hour activity profiles preoperatively and at 1 and 2 years postoperatively. 3D gait analysis was performed to determine changes in temporospatial and kinematic parameters of the hip and pelvis.

Results:

--Patients showed improvements in all temporospatial and kinematic parameters with time.

--Preoperatively, patients were sedentary or asleep for a meantime of 19.5 ± 2.2 hours per day. This remained unchanged up to 2 years postoperatively.

--Sleep efficiency remained suboptimal at all time points and was worse at 2 years compared with preoperatively. More than one-quarter of the sample were sedentary for >11 hours per day at 1 year and 2 years, which was greater than the preoperative percentage.

--Patients accumulated their activity performing light activities; however, patients performed less light activity at 2 years compared with preoperative levels. No significant differences were observed for moderate or vigorous activity across time.

Together with improvements in self-reported pain and perceived physical function, patients had significantly improved gait function postoperatively. However, despite the opportunity for patients to be more physically active postoperatively, patients were more sedentary, slept worse, and performed less physical activity at 2 years compared with preoperative levels.

Source: https://journals.lww.com/jbjsjournal/Abstract/9900/Changes_in_24_Hour_Physical_Activity_Patterns_and.238.aspx
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