How to use tear osmolarity to help treat dry eye disease
Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...
Even in our era of modern health care, it is often challenging to identify and manage dry eye disease (DED)—at least in part because it is often difficult to diagnose.1 This disparity may be due to the fact that in many instances, the signs, symptoms, and severity of the condition correlate poorly or not at all.2 For the patient, perhaps the most significant symptom of DED is fluctuating or reduced vision.

According to the Dry Eye WorkShop (DEWS) definition, dry eye is “a multifactorial disease of the tears and ocular surface that results in symptoms of discomfort, visual disturbance, and tear film instability with potential damage to the ocular surface. It is accompanied by increased osmolarity of the tear film and inflammation of the ocular surface.”

Stern et al identified the disparate components that function together to protect and nourish the ocular surface:

• Cornea

• Conjunctiva

• Accessory lacrimal glands

• Meibomian glands

• Main lacrimal gland

• Interconnecting innervation system

https://goo.gl/k0QFPn
Preview
Like
Comment
Share