Hypoglossal nerve stimulator effective in the treatment of O
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Veterans have an increased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and high levels of intolerance to positive airway pressure (PAP). In a recent study on veterans, researchers have reported that hypoglossal nerve stimulator (HNS) improves OSA severity and sleepiness.

This study by the Laryngoscope was aimed 1) to assess postoperative changes in OSA severity and sleepiness in a veteran only population after HNS; 2) to compare postoperative changes in OSA severity, sleepiness and HNS adherence between veterans with and without PTSD; and 3) to compare HNS adherence in population to HNS adherence in the current literature as well as published PAP adherence data.

Clinical data on consecutive patients undergoing HNS in a Veterans Affairs hospital were examined for demographic data as well as medical, sleep, and mental health comorbidities. The overall cohort as well as subsets of patients with and without PTSD were examined for postoperative changes in OSA severity, and sleepiness, as well as for device adherence.

26 patients met PCL?5 criteria for PTSD and 17 did not.

--OSA severity and sleepiness improved significantly in the overall cohort after HNS; median (IQR) AHI decreased from 39.2 to 7.4 events/hour, mean LSAT increased from 81% to 88% and mean ESS decreased from 10.9 to 6.7.

--These improvements were similar between patients with and without PTSD. Overall device adherence was 6.1?hours/night for the overall cohort and was not significantly different between patients with and without PTSD.

Conclusively, HNS is an efficacious therapy in a veteran population, providing patients with significant improvements in OSA severity and sleepiness. Veterans with and without PTSD benefited similarly from HNS when comparing improvements in sleep apnea severity and sleepiness as well as device usage. Adherence was similar to previously published HNS adherence data and better than PAP adherence reported in the literature.

Source: https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.29292
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