Imbalance in gum bacteria linked to Alzheimer's disease biom
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Older adults with more harmful than healthy bacteria in their gums are more likely to have evidence for the amyloid beta--a key biomarker for Alzheimer's disease--in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), according to new research from NYU College of Dentistry and Weill Cornell Medicine. However, this imbalance in oral bacteria was not associated with another Alzheimer's biomarker called tau.

Periodontal disease is a chronic, inflammatory bacterial dysbiosis that is associated with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down syndrome.

A total of 48 elderly cognitively normal subjects were evaluated for differences in subgingival periodontal bacteria (assayed by 16S rRNA sequencing) between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker groups of amyloid and neurofibrillary pathology. A dysbiotic index (DI) was defined at the genus level as the abundance ratio of known periodontal bacteria to healthy bacteria. Analysis of variance/analysis of covariance (ANOVA/ANCOVA), linear discriminant effect?size analyses (LEfSe) were used to determine the bacterial genera and species differences between the CSF biomarker groups.

At genera and species levels, higher subgingival periodontal dysbiosis was associated with reduced CSF amyloid beta 42 but not with P?tau.

The study shows a selective relationship between periodontal disease bacterial dysbiosis and CSF biomarkers of amyloidosis, but not for tau.

Source: https://doi.org/10.1002/dad2.12172
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