Immune system, not COVID virus, may pose greatest risk to pr
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Pregnant women infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 are more likely to experience preterm births, pre-eclampsia, and other neonatal problems than non-infected women. Scientists found that while evidence of the virus in the placenta is rare, the placenta in infected mothers tended to exhibit a much higher level of immune system activity than those of non-infected pregnant women.

"The good news is the placenta is mounting a robust defense against an infection that is far distant, in lungs or nasal tissue," said the investigator. "On the other hand, the high level of immune system activity might be leading to other deleterious effects on the pregnancy."

The team analyzed blood and placental tissue in 39 infected as well as COVID-free expectant mothers at different stages of pregnancy. While they found evidence of the virus in only two samples of placental tissue, they did find ACE2 receptors-which the SARS-CoV-2 virus uses to enter cells in the placentas of most women during the first trimester of pregnancy. Those receptors had largely disappeared in healthy women at later stages of pregnancy.

"It is very important to closely monitor expectant mothers who become infected early in pregnancy," concluded the author.

Med
Source: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.medj.2021.04.016
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Dr. J●i B●●●●i
Dr. J●i B●●●●i Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Good article.
Apr 26, 2021Like