In a complete overhaul, Govt proposes to replace MCI with Na
Government think-tank NITI Aayog has proposed the National Medical Commission Bill, 2016 which seeks to replace the existing Medical Council of India (MCI) with a new advisory body, called the National Medical Commission (NMC).

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Dr. S●●●●●●K S●N
Dr. S●●●●●●K S●N Anaesthesiology
Medical Education in the country. Instead of helping the colleges to impart a minimum standard of education, MCI overlooks the entire shortfall for a price. In the bargain, the students suffer. With the present system prevailing, it is impossible to fulfill all the criteria stipulated by the MCI. A vicious cycle has been established. There should be a way forward. To bring back the past glory of Medical Education in India needs a paradigm shift. First point may be called Fee Rationalization. To achieve this goal, it is imperative to obtain the financial implications of running a Medical College with its attached Hospital, Peripheral Clinics and Health Centres. Central or State Health Departments are the best sources to obtain these data. A database of around 100 government colleges can be made. One point to be noted is that government hospitals provide free treatment to a vast number of patients. Private colleges are less generous. Taking all these factors into account a viable fee st... Read more
Aug 27, 2016Like
Dr. S●●●●●●K S●N
Dr. S●●●●●●K S●N Anaesthesiology
Can be figured. The second point is Teaching Faculty. The total number of established faculty runs short by 40\% of the demand. To circumvent the shortage of existing hierarchy structure of Professor downwards, a parallel system must be formed. There are many doctors working in Private Hospitals or independently, who are ready to impart knowledge to students. This is seen in the success story of National Board of Examination, where doctors from outside the purview of medical colleges, impart education to students preparing for their post-graduation qualification, the “Diplomate National Board” (DNB). These doctors can be utilised to teach undergraduates as well. Rope these doctors into medical colleges. Call them Senior or Junior Consultants, according to their age and experience. Then let the students give scores to all these teachers. The scorecard will speak for these eligible teacher. Those who succeedingly score good points and publish papers in Indexed Journals can be inducted int... Read more
Aug 27, 2016Like
Dr. S●●●●●●K S●N
Dr. S●●●●●●K S●N Anaesthesiology
Into a permanent teaching hierarchy. Point three deals with Infrastructure. Be lenient on infrastructure. For an under-graduate education programme, restructure the minimum requirement. Add infrastructure in phases as the college prepares for post-graduation study. This has a threefold effect. Firstly, the fee structure per student can be brought down. Next, some unnecessary running cost can be curtailed. Thirdly, this will give breathing space to the sponsors of the college. WHO recommends 1 doctor per 1000 population. To meet this objective India needs 150 more medical colleges. Russia, China and many other countries are draining our exchequer of foreign exchange. It’s time to standardize the education and stop drainage of vital foreign exchange. Hopefully, the new Medical Education Commission with its three wings will redraw the existing map. It will be a pity if it becomes the same body with a different name.... Read more
Aug 27, 2016Like