It is important to add axial and sagittal planes’ data to di
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Background
Acetabular dysplasia (AD) is a well-known cause of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip, with its prevalence previously determined on plain radiography. The prevalence of preexisting AD was reported as 7.3% in a patient-based Asian population. Although computed tomography (CT) could evaluate AD in multiple planes, its prevalence using multiplanar CT images has not been reported. We investigated its prevalence with CT on coronal, axial, and sagittal planes and then determined if adding the axial and sagittal planes enhanced the investigation.

Methods
We retrospectively examined 52 consecutive Japanese individuals (mean age 59.4 years) who had undergone CT for conditions unrelated to hip disorders. The inclusion criteria of CT images were (1) reconstructed axial slice thickness of ≤1 mm and (2) normal pelvic rotations and tilt. Exclusion criteria were (1) age <20 years, (2) neither hip center could be clearly detected, (3) evidence of hip OA. The parameters used to define AD on the coronal plane were the center–edge angle, Sharp angle, acetabular index, acetabular depth ratio, and acetabulum head index. The anterior and posterior acetabular sector angles were used as axial parameters and the vertical-center-anterior margin angle as the sagittal parameter. AD prevalence was calculated using multiplanar images and then compared with the previously reported Asian prevalence using 95% confidence intervals (CI). In this study, we defined “prevalence” as the proportion of subjects who had AD in at least one hip.

Results
The mean prevalence of AD on coronal, axial, and sagittal planes was 16.9, 15.4, and 7.7%, respectively. The lowest prevalence found by combining the three planes was 25.0% (95% CI 15.2–38.2%). This prevalence was significantly higher than that in the previously reported Asian population (7.3%).

Conclusions
At the lowest estimate, the prevalence of AD evaluated in three planes was more than twice as high as the previously reported prevalence in Asians when we investigated its prevalence using multiplanar images. The prevalence of AD in the axial and sagittal planes was not negligible. We therefore suggest that it is important to add axial and sagittal planes’ data when investigating the prevalence of AD.

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