JAMA Study finds association of Structural Changes in the Br
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Long-duration spaceflight induces structural changes in the brain and eye. A Study was conducted that determined an association between quantitative changes in intracranial compartment volumes and peripapillary total retinal thickness after spaceflight.

This cohort study included healthy International Space Station crew members before and immediately after long-duration spaceflight. Data on race were not collected.

Results:
--In 19 healthy crew members included in this study (5 women, 14 men) analyses revealed a positive, although not definitive, association between spaceflight-induced changes in total retinal thickness and lateral ventricle volume (4.7-microm increase in postflight total retinal thickness per 1-mL postflight increase in lateral ventricle volume).

--Adjustments for mission duration improved the strength of association (5.1 microm).

--No associations were detected between spaceflight-induced changes in total retinal thickness and white matter volume (0.02 microm) or brain tissue plus cerebrospinal fluid volume, an estimate of intracranial volume (0.02 microm).

In conclusion, these findings contribute to the understanding of spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome and the physiologic correlations of headward fluid changes with central nervous system outcomes during spaceflight. Although weightlessness-induced fluid redistribution during spaceflight can be a common stressor to the brain and retina, the production of optic disc edema appears to be uncoupled from changes in the intracranial compartment, based on the likely poor connection between increased total retinal thickness and lateral ventricle volume.

Source: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/2780311
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