Late Onset Interface Calcium Deposition After Laser In Situ
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The purpose of this study was to report a novel clinical entity characterized by bilateral calcium deposits in the flap interface after uncomplicated laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK).

To define and describe the origin of the interface opacities, a slit-lamp test, anterior segment optical coherence tomography imaging, and histopathologic analysis of an interface opacity were performed. 5 years after LASIK surgery, two separate stable young men who had LASIK in both eyes at the ages of 20 (case 1) and 44 (case 2) were diagnosed with bilateral, white anterior stromal opacities.

Results:
--Slit-lamp examination and anterior segment optical coherence tomography imaging demonstrated that the opacities were located at the level of the LASIK interface in both eyes of both cases, with most of the opacities located at the temporal edge of the flap in each eye of case 2.

--An opacity from case 2 demonstrated birefringence using polarization microscopy and staining with Alizarin red, indicative of calcium deposition.

--The serum calcium level was borderline elevated in case 1 and within normal limits in case 2.

In people with granular corneal dystrophy type 2, intrastromal calcium deposition may occur after LASIK surgery, with deposits that look like dystrophic deposits in the LASIK flap interface. Since the etiology and treatment of calcific and dystrophic interface deposition after LASIK vary, clinicians must distinguish the two entities based on observation, diagnostic imaging, and, if appropriate, molecular genetic analysis.

Source: https://journals.lww.com/corneajrnl/Abstract/9000/Late_Onset_Interface_Calcium_Deposition_After.95784.aspx
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