Low plasma vitamin D level an independent risk factor for CO
Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...
Get authentic, real-time news that helps you fight COVID-19 better.
Install PlexusMD App for doctors. It's free.
The study, done by the Leumit Health Services and researchers at the Bar-Ilan University, confirmed a correlation between low levels of vitamin D and the chances of contracting the disease.

The researchers also found a correlation between vitamin D deficiency and odds of being admitted into a hospital with coronavirus, but this link lost its relevance when other factors were also accounted for.

The study population included the 14,000 members who were tested for COVID-19 infection, and who had at least one previous blood test for plasma 25(OH)D level. "Suboptimal" or "low" plasma 25(OH)D level was defined as plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, or 25(OH)D, concentration below the level of 30 ng/mL.

Results:
-- Of 7,807 individuals, 782 were COVID-19-positive, and 7,025 COVID-19-negative.
-- The mean plasma vitamin D level was significantly lower among those who tested positive than negative for COVID-19.
-- Univariate analysis demonstrated an association between low plasma 25(OH)D level and increased likelihood of COVID-19 infection, and of hospitalization due to the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
-- In multivariate analyses that controlled for demographic variables, and psychiatric and somatic disorders, the adjusted OR of COVID-19 infection, and of hospitalization due to the SARS-CoV-2 virus were preserved.
-- In the multivariate analyses, age over 50 years, male gender and low-medium socioeconomic status were also positively associated with the risk of COVID-19 infection; age over 50 years was positively associated with the likelihood of hospitalization due to COVID-19.

Conclusively, Low plasma 25(OH)D level appears to be an independent risk factor for COVID-19 infection and hospitalization.

Source: https://febs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/febs.15495
U●●a n●●●r and 10 others like this13 shares
Like
Comment
Share