Male infertility linked to higher mortality risk, finds stud
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Infertile men, especially those who were azoospermic, were at an increased risk for mortality compared with fertile men, according to an analysis of United States claims data published in Urology.

The researchers reviewed claims data from 134,796 infertile men (oligozoospermic men, 18,826; azoospermic men, 12,630) and 242,282 fertile men. The mean age of all men in the study was 35 years. Both cohorts had similar smoking and obesity rates.

They reported that 76 men (0.40%) with oligospermia and 88 men (0.70%) with azoospermia died during the 3.1 years of follow-up. There were also 615 (0.25%) fertile men who died during 3.6 years of follow-up. The men with azoospermia had a significantly increased risk for death vs. the men with oligospermia. In addition, the cohort of infertile men had a higher risk for death than the cohort of fertile men.

The researchers said that a higher risk for death among infertile men also existed when CVD, prevalent cancers and other chronic diseases such as COPD, depression, infectious diseases, liver diseases and renal disease were excluded. This suggests that baseline health alone does not explain why infertile men are at increased risk for mortality, according to the researchers.

It is possible that genetics, epigenetic, lifestyle or developmental factors may explain the association,” researchers said.

The findings, he added, offer physicians “an opportunity to engage infertile men more broadly about health.”

Source: https://www.goldjournal.net/article/S0090-4295(20)31180-8/fulltext
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