Management of Retained Genital Piercings
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Introduction
Genital piercing is increasing in frequency among many demographic groups. Genital piercings are unique as they may have a functional role in addition to aesthetical value, with some women reporting heightened sexual arousal and increased orgasm potential after clitoral piercings. In women, clitoral piercing may play a therapeutic role in overcoming past genital trauma or dysfunctional sexual relationships. As the popularity for genital piercing grows, the number of related complications is likely to increase. In a survey of men and women with genital piercings, 53% of participants reported complications as a result their procedure. Bleeding, infection, allergic reactions to jewelry, keloid formation, and scarring have been reported among the complications of female genital piercings. Embedded jewelry after clitoral piercing is rare and the management is not well described in the literature. In this case report, we describe a case of a woman who presented to the emergency department with an embedded clitoral piercing, which was removed with a simple outpatient procedure.

Case
A 24-year-old female presented to the emergency room with pain at the site of her clitoral piercing for 1 day. She reported that earlier that day, she noted that the piercing did not move freely on with touching the area. The patient was sexually active one day prior. The patient's own attempts to remove the piercing were unsuccessful due to pain. She had also returned to the tattoo parlor where the piercing was performed 8 months earlier who recommended she seek medical care. On examination, the labia were normal without lesions. There was a straight metal barbell protruding at a perpendicular angle from the glans of the clitoris. On closer inspection, one of the removable balls was missing from the barbell externally and on palpation, the other ball attached to the straight barbell was appreciated underneath the glans of the clitoris. There was no drainage, bleeding, or evidence of infection.....

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5337326/
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