Management of calcific myonecrosis with a sinus tract
Calcific myonecrosis is a very rare late sequela that occurs in patients who have had trauma accompanied by vascular compromise, in which a single muscle or entire muscles in a compartment undergoes necrosis and form a calcified mass. It is mostly a benign entity, but some cases cause bone destruction and form non-healing chronic sinuses. In such cases, wound management becomes difficult and there is a potential risk of secondary infection.

A 60-year-old male was referred for evaluation of a pain, erythematous changes, and draining sinus of the anterolateral aspect of his left leg. He had an open reduction and internal fixation as well as a stent insertion in the femoral artery owing to a distal femur fracture and femoral artery rupture.

A thick fluid with a chalk-like material was discharged through the shiny skin via the sinus. The radiographs of the left leg revealed a large, fusiform-shaped, radiopaque soft tissue mass in the space between the tibia and fibula.

Pathologic evaluation revealed acute and chronic inflammation with dystrophic calcification. These findings led to the diagnosis of calcific myonecrosis. An extensive debridement of the anterior and deep posterior compartments performed to ensure definitive treatment, a drain tube was inserted and primary closure was done.

The fluid continued to be discharged through the drain even after the surgery; delayed wound healing occurred 4 weeks following the surgery, and there was no recurrence at follow-up conducted 2 years later.

Lessons:
- Calcific myonecrosis is mostly a benign entity, but some cases of calcific myonecrosis cause bone destruction and form non-healing chronic sinuses.

- In such cases, surgical treatment is required, during which the necrotic tissue and calcific material must be extensively debrided and drained.

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