Maternal, placental and neonatal outcomes after asymptomatic
Highlights:

• The effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the first trimester on the pregnant woman and the fetus remain unclear.

• Asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection in early pregnancy might not have major harmful effects on the mother and the fetus

The effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the first trimester on the pregnant woman and the fetus remain unclear. A woman tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA in nasopharyngeal swabs in her seventh week of gestation and was admitted to a local hospital for treatment. Although the woman had a BMI above 28 and a total gestational weight gain of 21 kg, no pregnancy complications or severe complications related to SARS-CoV-2 were reported. An ultrasound scan identified no fetal abnormalities at 22 weeks. The pregnancy ended at term (37 weeks), and the newborn's birth weight was 3100 g. Placental insufficiency was revealed by placental histology examination but this appeared not to be related to the SARS-CoV-2 infection. In-situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical tests for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, spike protein 1, and nucleocapsid proteins were negative. However, ACE-2 was positive in samples of the placenta, umbilical cord and fetal membrane. The baby was followed up through to 10 days after birth and grew normally. These results suggest that asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection in the first trimester of pregnancy might not have significant harmful effects on the mother and the developing fetus. This finding may be of interest to the general public, midwives, and general practitioners. However, large population studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Source:https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214911221000394
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