Medical mysteries: Patches of bumps and dry skin mask in a m
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Dr. Rekha Rao
Medical mysteries: Patches of bumps and dry skin mask in a middle age female. What was the cause?
4 years ago, Jessica Baskin Taylor noticed a series of small, hard bumps the size of pencil erasers under the skin surrounding her elbow. A few months before this, Taylor, pregnant with her first child, had also developed very dry patches of reddened skin on her legs. In early 2007, she visited a dermatologist after bumps appeared on her torso. The dermatologist did not seem concerned and focused on three bumps that had recently appeared on Taylor’s inner arm.

She advised Taylor to use a topical cortisone cream. The spots on her torso disappeared, but those on her arm remained. She sought an opinion from a second dermatologist who gave her a new cream to us. In a few weeks, the bumps disappeared only to reappear several months later. Two years later she noticed a large, squishy nickel-size lump protruding from her right inner thigh and consulted a physician. He examined the area and told Taylor it was probably a boil, an infection caused by staphylococcus bacteria or an infected hair follicle. He prescribed an oral antibiotic and a topical cream. Neither treatment helped. She consulted another dermatologist who removed the growth and sent it for a biopsy. The results were shocking. Can you find out what was the cause?

Option 1: Spider bites

Option 2: Folliculitis

Option 3: Eczema

Option 4: Contact dermatitis

Option 5: Lymphoma
Dr. S●●h P●●●l and 6 others like this
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Dr. s●●●●h  k●●●a
Dr. s●●●●h k●●●a Internal Medicine
Cutaneous t cell lymphoma
Mar 27, 2017Like
Dr. A●●●d F●●●●q
Dr. A●●●d F●●●●q General Medicine
Lymphoma
Mar 28, 2017Like
Dr. R●●●a R●o
Dr. R●●●a R●o Internal Medicine
The biopsy revealed that the painful lump on Taylor’s thigh was a primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a slow-growing cancer that, like hairy cell leukemia, affects white blood cells. It is associated with, or preceded by, lymphotoid papulosis — the bumps that first appeared on Taylor’s elbow four years earlier and occur in about one in a million people. And those dry red patches were mycosis fungoides, a sign of lymphoma that can be mistaken for eczema. Further testing revealed that Taylor had primary cutaneous CD 30+ lymphoproliferative disorder. There is no cure for the disorder, nor is there a known cause; treatment involves suppressing new lesions and eradicating existing ones, sometimes through radiation or drug therapy, including steroids.... Read more
Mar 28, 2017Like