Model-Based Estimation of Colorectal Cancer Screening and Ou
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The findings of this JAMA Surgery suggest that increasing fecal immunochemical test (FIT) use for colorectal cancer screening during the COVID-19 pandemic may mitigate the consequences of reduced screening rates caused by the pandemic for colorectal cancer outcomes.

The study objective was to estimate the degree to which expanding fecal immunochemical test–based colorectal cancer screening participation during the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with clinical outcomes.

A previously developed simulation model was adopted to estimate how much COVID-19 may have contributed to colorectal cancer outcomes. The model included the US population estimated to have completed colorectal cancer screening pre–COVID-19 according to the American Cancer Society. The model was designed to estimate colorectal cancer outcomes between 2020 and 2023. This analysis was completed between July and December 2020.

~~In the simulation model, COVID-19–related reductions in care utilization resulted in an estimated 1?176942 to 2014?164 fewer colorectal cancer screenings, 8346 to 12894 fewer colorectal cancer diagnoses, and 6113 to 9301 fewer early-stage colorectal cancer diagnoses between 2020 and 2023.

~~With an abbreviated period of reduced colorectal cancer screenings, increasing fecal immunochemical test use was associated with an estimated additional 588844 colorectal cancer screenings and 2836 colorectal cancer diagnoses, of which 1953 (68.9%) were early stage.

~~In the event of a prolonged period of reduced colorectal cancer screenings, increasing fecal immunochemical test use was associated with an estimated additional 655825 colorectal cancer screenings and 2715 colorectal cancer diagnoses, of which 1944 (71.6%) were early stage.

These results suggest that the increased use of fecal immunochemical tests during the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with increased colorectal cancer screening participation and more colorectal cancer diagnoses at earlier stages. If the estimates are borne out in real-world clinical practice, increasing fecal immunochemical test–based colorectal cancer screening participation during the COVID-19 pandemic could mitigate the consequences of reduced screening rates during the pandemic for colorectal cancer outcomes.

Source: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2778450
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