Neonatal morbidities in Infants born at 35-36 weeks of gesta
Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...
A Study was conducted to assess the risk for neonatal morbidities among infants born late preterm at 35-36 gestational weeks, early-term (37-38 weeks), and late-term (41 weeks) infants, compared with full-term (39-40 weeks) infants.

This nationwide population-based cohort study included 1,650,450 non-malformed liveborn singleton infants born at 35 to 41 weeks between 1998 and 2016 in Sweden. Risk ratios (RRs) for low Apgar score (0-3) at 5 minutes; respiratory, metabolic, infectious and neurological morbidities; and severe neonatal morbidity (composite outcome) were adjusted for maternal, pregnancy, delivery and infant characteristics.

Results:
--Compared with infants born at 39-40 weeks, adjusted RRs and proportions of infants born at 35-36 weeks were higher for:
metabolic morbidity 7.79; respiratory morbidity 5.54 ; severe neonatal morbidity 2.42 ; infectious morbidity 1.98 ; neurological morbidity 1.74; and low Apgar score 2.07.

--Risks for respiratory, severe neonatal morbidity, infectious, neurological morbidities, and low Apgar score were highest at 35 weeks, gradually declined until 39 weeks, and increased at 39 to 41 weeks.

In summary, Infants who are born late in preterm at 35-36 weeks of gestation are subject to an increased risk of neonatal diseases, although there is a low absolute risk of serious neonatal diseases. These conclusions further increase the need to avoid late delivery in order to minimize neonatal morbidity and to help professionals and families evaluate the risk better.

Source: https://www.jpeds.com/article/S0022-3476(21)00205-5/fulltext?rss=yes
Like
Comment
Share