New Study Evaluates How Different Face Masks Affect The Acou
Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...
The team tested medical masks, disposable surgical masks, masks with clear plastic windows around the mouth, and homemade and store-bought cloth masks made of different fabric types and numbers of layers. The researchers used a special loudspeaker, custom and shaped like a human head so that sound radiates as it would coming from a human mouth.

Using a real person makes the sounds less repeatable because they can't say the same thing the same way every time. However, it does let the researchers account for the real shape of the head and real movements of lips. Even though these two data sets are a bit different, they both show which sound frequencies are most affected by mask-wearing and which masks have the strongest effects.

Their data showed that all masks muffle the quiet, high-frequency sound generated when a person pronounces consonants. Those sounds are already a challenge for those with hearing loss, with or without masks, and even become a challenge for those without hearing loss when you throw a mask into the mix.

The study found that disposable surgical masks offer the best acoustic performance among all tested, the team suggested that multilayer masks made of loosely woven cotton may offer a reasonable compromise between droplet-blocking efficiency and acoustic performance. The good news is that most masks do not completely block sound, they simply deflect it away from the mouth.

Source:
https://asa.scitation.org/doi/10.1121/10.0002279
Dr. T●●●●z H●●●●●●i and 3 others like this
Like
Comment
Share