New findings on characteristics of Burning Mouth Syndrome
The picture is becoming clearer regarding the chronic oral pain condition known as Burning Mouth Syndrome, or BMS, which mainly affects women who are middle-aged and older.

In a dissertation at Sahlgrenska Academy, additional steps are being taken toward better diagnosis and treatment. The dissertation work is part of a larger project aimed at finding a model for BMS that can facilitate diagnosis and treatment in the future.

BMS is a challenge for health care providers, particularly in dental care, and a debilitating condition for many of the patients. When they estimate their problem on a visual analogue scale (VAS) where 0 is "not at all difficult" and 100 is "unbearable," the average response is 66, the dissertation indicates. The findings came from 56 women with BMS.

The dissertation also connected clinical findings and self-reported reported findings from questionnaires from patients with BMS about their symptoms and background (other diseases, use of medications, etc.) along with saliva-related factors. The results have been compared with a gender- and age-matched control group.

It turns out that 45% of the BMS patients reported to have altered taste sensations. A total of 73% experienced pain that was burning or stinging or a combination of the two, but stinging and numbness also occurred. The fact that the BMS patients, compared with people in the control group, report that they suffer considerably more from skin diseases and skin problems is a new discovery.

Read more here: https://pxmd.co/VMVRC
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