Non-invasive imaging technique accurately detects skin cance
Researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering have developed a non-invasive imaging technique that accurately detects skin cancer without a surgical biopsy. Multiphoton microscopy of mitochondria—small organelles that produce energy in cells—accurately identified melanomas and basal cell carcinomas by detecting abnormal clusters of mitochondria in both types of skin cancer.

"The technology developed here has the potential to make the detection of skin cancers extremely rapid and feasible at very early stages," says Behrouz Shabestari, Ph.D., director of the NIBIB Program in Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy. "Rather than taking a biopsy sample that must be processed and then examined under a microscope by a pathologist, this system involves simply looking through the microscope at the patient's skin and determining whether it is cancerous or not, within minutes."

A group of international collaborators led by co-senior author Irene Georgakoudi, Ph.D., in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Tufts, found that mitochondria behave very differently in healthy versus cancerous tissue. They used a laser microscopy technique that takes advantage of the characteristics of a key molecule in mitochondria, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), that is central to energy production. They found that NADH, which naturally fluoresces without injecting any dye or contrast agent into the individuals being screened, can be detected using multiphoton microscopy to provide diagnostically useful information about the organization of the mitochondria in skin cells.

http://www.news-medical.net/news/20170213/Non-invasive-imaging-technique-accurately-detects-skin-cancer-withoutc2a0surgicalc2a0biopsy.aspx
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