Nonspecialist-Delivered Interventions for Perinatal Mental H
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This JAMA study found evidence in high-income countries to support that nonspecialist providers may be effective in preventing and treating perinatal depressive and anxiety symptoms.

Task sharing—or training of nonspecialist providers with no formal training in counseling—is an effective strategy to improve access to evidence-based counseling interventions and has the potential to address the burden of perinatal depression and anxiety. The objective was to identify the relevant implementation processes (who, what, where, and how) and to assess the effectiveness of counseling interventions delivered by nonspecialist providers.

Randomized clinical trials of counseling interventions that assessed depression or anxiety after the intervention, delivered by a non-specialist provider for adults, and that targeted perinatal populations in a high-income country were included. For effectiveness, primary and secondary outcome data of depression, anxiety, or both symptoms were used, with separate analyses for prevention and treatment, stratified by depression or anxiety.

In total, 46 trials were included in the systematic review; 44 trials were included in the meta-analysis. Interventions were implemented across 11 countries.
--Compared with controls, counseling interventions were associated with lower depressive symptoms and anxiety scores.
--Treatment interventions were reported to be effective for both depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms.

Conclusively, nonspecialist providers may be effective in delivering counseling interventions in high-income countries.

Source: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/article-abstract/2775992
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