Not All Cloth Masks Are Equally Protective— Droplet study sh
Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...
Get authentic, real-time news that helps you fight COVID-19 better.
Install PlexusMD App for doctors. It's free.
Much like toilet paper, single-ply cotton cloth face masks don't do as much as the cushier stuff to block the droplet spread caused by coughing and sneezing. , researchers affirmed.

In a surrogate-marker study of protection against COVID-19 spread, a high-speed video capture of droplet dispersal and aerosolization showed the result when a healthy volunteer coughed, sneezed, and talked while wearing a range of masks.

"From the captured video it can be observed that, for speaking, a single-layer cloth face covering reduced the droplet spread but a double-layer covering performed better," they reported in a case study in Thorax. "Even a single-layer face covering is better than no face covering."

For coughing and sneezing, though, a double-layer cloth face covering was significantly better at reducing the droplet spread. A three-ply surgical mask performed best of all for every type of respiratory emission, the group noted.

The CDC has recommended wearing a mask to reduce spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, although surgical and N95 type masks should be reserved for healthcare settings due to limited supply. Studies and meta-analyses have backed reduced transmission of the virus with the lower-grade masks and supported multi-layer versions as more protective.

Source: https://thorax.bmj.com/content/early/2020/07/24/thoraxjnl-2020-215748
Dr. T●●●●z H●●●●●●i and 3 others like this4 shares
Like
Comment
Share