Obesity & high BMI Is Preferentially Associated With Patello
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A well-known association exists between obesity and knee osteoarthritis (OA) for both incidence and progression of the disease.

The OA initiative, a prospective sample of 4,796 patients, was used for this study. Patients were stratified into increasing body mass index (BMI) cohorts. Knee MRIs were assessed using the semiquantitative MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score scores. Patellofemoral (PF), medial, and lateral compartment cartilage scores were compared among BMI cohorts, controlling for confounders using linear regression models.

Results:
In total, 2,006 patients were present in our cohort, 773 men and 1,233 women; the mean age was 61.7 ± 8.9 years.

--Increasing BMI was independently associated with increasing grades of PF wear for both right and left knees in the lateral patella facet (right knee beta: 0.208, left knee beta: 0.147), medial femoral trochlea (right knee beta: 0.135, left knee beta: 0.142,), and lateral femoral trochlea (right knee beta: 0.163, left knee beta: 0.147).

--For the right knee, increasing BMI was associated with medial compartment wear in the posterior femoral area (beta: 0.070) and lateral compartment wear in the central tibial area (beta: 0.070). For the left knee, increasing BMI was associated with medial compartment wear in the central femoral area (beta: 0.093).

In particular, relative to the tibiofemoral compartment, obesity is correlated preferentially with increased cartilage wear in the PF compartment. To lower forces on the PF joint, physical therapy and exercise programmes that encourage weight loss should be changed.

Source: https://journals.lww.com/jaaos/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=9900&issue=00000&article=00051&type=Abstract
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