Obesity During Midlife In Women May Increase Risk Of Kidney
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Researchers from Johns Hopkins found both Black and white women who were obese at midlife had increased risks for eGFR decline and end-stage kidney disease after 30 years of follow-up. These results differed for men, however, with only Black men who were obese at midlife having an increased risk for ESKD later in life.

In this Observational study, 13,496 participants from the ARIC study were included and were analyzed for Midlife obesity status as measured by body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio, and predicted percent fat at baseline. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using serum creatinine measured at 5 study visits and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD).

Results:
-- Baseline mean age was 54 years, median eGFR was 103 ml/min/1.73 m2, and median BMI was 27 kg/m2.
-- Over 30 years of follow-up, midlife obesity measures were associated with eGFR decline in white and black women but not consistently in men.
-- Adjusted for age, center, smoking and coronary heart disease (CHD), the differences in eGFR decline slope per standard deviation higher BMI, waist to hip ratio, and predicted percent fat were 0.09, -0.25 and -0.14 for white men, -0.91, -0.82 and -1.02 for white women, -0.70, -1.60 and -1.24 for black men, and -1.24, -1.50 and -1.43 for black women.
-- Obesity indicators were independently associated with risk of ESKD for all sex-race groups except white men.

The limitations of the study was the loss to follow-up during three decades of follow-up with five eGFR measurements.

Conclusively, Obesity status is a risk factor for future decline in kidney function and development of ESKD in black and white women with less consistent associations among men.

Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0272638620310039
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